Wellness Incentive Tier 1 – Time is Running Out!

Complete your Personal Health Assessment and read the 2018 Healthy for Life User Guide by April 30, to be eligible for Tier 2.

A computer lab has been reserved for your convenience on Friday April 27, in Express Scripts Hall – Room 003. The computer lab will be open from 9 am to 3 pm to give everyone the opportunity to ask questions and complete Tier 1, before the April 30th deadline. Continue reading

Seven Alternatives To ‘Thank You’

Recently, the Recognition task force completed the 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace quiz. Words of Affirmation ranked highest among all participants as the preferred method of recognition. Below is an article recently posted by Forbes Community Voice affirming how genuine gratitude and appreciation make an impact on how you make others feel in the workplace.

Post written by: Cord Himelstein, VP of marketing for HALO Recognition, helping companies worldwide create meaningful recognition strategies that celebrate their people.

Thanks, but no thanks.

Saying “thank you” is our business when it comes to the corporate world. In a nutshell, my company helps companies find better ways to say it to their employees. Needless to say, communications and public speaking play a huge role in realizing that. A good general lesson I’ve learned is that simply saying “thank you” is not always enough. It can wear out its welcome, or worse, come off as insincere. Everyone can benefit from having multiple tactics for saying it.

There is quantifiable power in gratitude.

Basic kindness has real power. For example, in an NBC Season of Kindness Poll, 70% of the 2,650 adults surveyed said they would forgo a 10% raise for a kinder boss. In most areas of life, gratitude is always welcome and a requisite for getting things done smoothly. Whether or not a person says “thank you” after you do something for them is a much-relied-upon barometer for sizing up the intentions of others in life. We all intuitively recognize the phrase as a bar of social grace, and that’s what can complicate matters.

In our line of work, we try to quantify gratitude. We tally up plaudits by location and help companies understand why “thank you” isn’t cutting it in some places. From a communications perspective, we get to observe the interesting side effects gratitude has across large populations over time. One of those side effects is repetition and casualness in the way we say thanks.

We can get into a habit of saying “thank you” for everything. It becomes a reaction instead of an interaction. We forget to call out specific things. We stop identifying the real qualities we appreciate about the person or relationship. We become generic with our gratitude and important details — the building blocks of genuine relationships — are lost. The effects are insidious and easy to ignore.

Variety makes us tick.

In a 2014 LinkedIn post, renowned author and personal coach Tony Robbins identified six basic needs that make us tick, based on psychologist Abraham Maslow’s famous hierarchy of needs theory. Robbins argues that as much as we need certainty and comfort to be happy, we also need uncertainty and variety to grow.

People don’t want generic lives and eventually get tired of the same old thing. Our burning need to create new experiences that enrich our lives, what Maslow called self-actualization, is strong. To that point, how you communicate thanks is just as (if not more) important as remembering to do it in the first place.

Here are seven alternatives to ‘thank you.’

Saying “thank you” in a slightly unexpected way is a minor speech adjustment with the potential to unlock a lot of good energy and elicit more sincere responses. It also establishes new lines of communication and, as a bonus, increases your personal mystique. These seven alternatives are great ways to catch people off guard and create deeper bonds. And they might make them feel better about themselves than a generic “thank you” would.

1. “I appreciate you.”

2. “Let me know if you need anything else.”

3. “Couldn’t have done it without you.”

4. “You made this easy.”

5. “You’re so helpful.”

6. “What do you think?”

7. “I’m impressed!”

‘Thank you’ is still cool.

You shouldn’t take this to mean that saying “thank you” isn’t cool anymore. It’s still very cool, and if you like saying it, don’t ever stop. But what this all boils down to is that people need more than rote validation to feel fulfilled in a relationship. They need opportunities to self-actualize, as well as a touch of variety to offset certainty every now and again. Anything you say to a person over and over again to the same tune is going to lose its effect and turn into static over time. As Mr. Robbins might say, it’s about giving people the surprises they actually want.

Welcome New Employees!


The following employees were in attendance at the most recent New Employee Orientation on April 9, 2018.  Please join us in welcoming them to UMSL!

Back Row, Left to Right: Chelsea Johnson (Center for Teaching & Learning), James Bragado (Alumni Activities), Melinda Bier (Center for Character & Citizenship- transitioned to full-time), Maurice Garner (Groundskeeper I), Sarah Fentem (KWMU)

Front Row, Left to Right:  Bridget Coffey (MIMH), Anastasia Hercules (MIMH),
Melody Walker (KWMU)

Help Victims During Sexual Assault Awareness Month

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month.  To show our support and bring awareness to the issues facing victims of sexual violence, HR/Title IX is sponsoring a drive to support Safe Connections, one of the region’s oldest and largest victim support organizations working to prevent and end domestic and sexual violence.

Donation of the items listed below will assist Safe Connections to help survivors of domestic and sexual assault.  Between April 9th through April 25th donation bins will be located throughout the campus including Woods Hall, Arts Administration Building, MSC (1st and 2nd floors) and Marillac Hall. Continue reading

Live in Presence and Avoid the Drama Triangle

On the way into work one day I was listening to a story on NPR that triggered a string of thoughts to the extent that I completely missed the last part of the story.  This is especially easy to do in an age when most of our media comes with a ‘pause’ or a ‘replay’ button.  So until we are able to hit ‘pause’ and ‘replay’ on our conversations with people, our only option is to stay present.

Being present as a leader means attending to the here and now, being and moving in concert with what is happening.  It’s easy to drift away from presence – to shift into autopilot based on assumptions, to jump to conclusions or start building our response before a speaker has finished speaking.  The problem comes when those responses set us up to play one of the roles in the drama triangle.  The short video below explains each of those roles and it’s easy to think of times when we and others have been Hero, Victim or Villain.  We cannot play one of these roles and be present at the same time.

The key to Presence and avoiding the Drama Triangle is to recognize when you are drifting and to claim a more productive role (Coach, Creator, Challenger).  There are a number of ways to to shift back to Presence:

  • Adopt a beginner’s mindset:  Reverse the order you do things, take a different route to work.  This will help your mind to stay out of autopilot and help stay present in the moment of the task.
  • Use your opposite hand:  Use your mouse, brush your hair, etc. with the opposite hand. You really really have to focus on your the task (literally) at hand!
  • Reorganize your books: stack them in a spiral, or organize them by color.
  • Pay attention to the full experience of walking: Focus on the sensations, the small and large movements you make while walking, how objects seem to move past you, the temperature, the wind, etc.
  • Pay attention to the full experience of breathing: The sounds, sensations, smells, etc. (this is a great way to get into a deep meditative state).
  • Play the A-Z game:  As you walk, try to spot all the letters of the alphabet, in order, as you walk.
  • Periodically stop and smile:  Become aware of the immediate physiological response in your body. Feels great, doesn’t it?
  • Conscious breathing:  While you hold it, notice and name 5 things you can see, feel, hear.
  • Conscious listening:  Put down the phone, mute the TV, look at the speaker and listen to understand.

The result of practicing the shift to Presence is that you will be aware when you begin to drift or when you are assuming a role in the drama triangle.  When you are able to break out of the triangle and be present with those around you, you will find more possibilities, place less blame, feel freer to be you and find yourself making it to the end of more of those stories on NPR.

 

myPerformance Employee Training: Last Chance to Sign-up

Employee self-appraisals are open March 15 – April 15.

To help you make the most of the myPerformance appraisal process, HR is providing training to help you perfect your self-appraisal, the first step in the myPerformance process.  The final session will be held on Wednesday, April 4th, at 3 p.m. in
J.C. Penney – Room 64.  To register use this link:
UMSL myPerformance Employee Sessions

This training covers:

  • Timeline for the process this year
  • Calibration – the process and the benefits
  • Evaluation criteria
  • Beneficial documentation
  • Scenarios – Understanding the rating scale

 

 

UMSL Employee Service Awards: February 2018 – April 2018

THANKS to the following employees for their service to UMSL.  Please join us in congratulating them for reaching a new milestone!

February 2018

5 Years
Megan Green – New Student Programs

25 Years
Marva Robinson – University Advancement

March 2018

5 Years
Joshua Beaman-Kogan – Psychological Services
Jacqueline Taylor-Braxton – University Center Operations

10 Years
Jonathan Lilienkamp – Academic IT Services

15 Years
Martha Green – Facilities Services
Judy Exner – UMSL-PD

April 2018

5 Years
Jessica Salamon – College of Arts & Sciences Dean’s Office
Stephani Disney – College of Optometry
Kevin Buchheit – UMSL-PD
Richard Jakubowicz – UMSL-PD

10 Years
Lee Gutmann – Facilities Services
Mike O’Steen – Finance & Administraton

15 Years
Emily Byrne – Academic Advising, CAS
Ellen Meadows – Academic Advising, COE
Marisa Smith – UMSL-PD

20 Years
Stephanie Fowler – Academic IT Services

30 Years
Kimberly Stanger – Math & Computer Science

Register for Focus on the Future Keynote Speaker Event!

There’s still time to register to see Focus on the Future keynote speaker, Wes Hoffman of Treehouse Network.  Join Wes as he delivers a thought-provoking and entertaining speech on mindfulness, motivation, and inspiration. Learn about how to develop a more positive outlook by becoming aware of thought patterns, letting go of the negative, and finding your passion within.   The event is on Thursday, March 29th, at 3 p.m. in MSC Century rooms B & C.

Registration Instructions for Focus on the Future: Staff Enrichment week

Log into myLearn using your SSO account.

1. Select the icon for “The Library” and the top of the page.
2. Click “UMSL” from the dropdown box. Listed under “University of Missouri Library”.
3. Select “UMSL Instructor Led Training” on the left side panel. Under “Categories”.
4. Scroll down the page until you find workshops titles that begin with “Focus on the Future. ” Select the “DETAILS” button for workshops you find most interesting. There are two pages.
5. To learn more about the course, select the “About” tab. Or by selecting “Details” on the “Sessions” tab.
6. To enroll in the course, select the “Sessions” tab and select “Enroll”. You may withdraw after enrollment, as well.
7. After enrolling you will receive an email to your UMSL account.  You may add that appointment to your Outlook calendar so you don’t forget the event. Open the calendar icon next to “Message”.
8. Select “Save & Close”.

myPerformance Tips

The myPerformance process opened on March 15th. The first step in the process is for staff to complete their self-appraisal, which provides you the opportunity to inform and remind your supervisor of your accomplishments throughout the last year. The review period coincides with our fiscal year which is July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018. The self-appraisal must be completed by April 15, 2018.

It is important for you to not only rate yourself, but to provide comments supporting your rating. Your comments will provide your supervisor with the information they should be considering when completing your appraisal. Your self-appraisal will also show your supervisor what areas to focus on in the appraisal meeting.

Remember to use the entire myPerformance tool, by going to the myPerformance website and clicking on myPerformance login on the right side of the page. The myPerformance section of the tool will help you organize information all year long that you would like to consider when completing your self-appraisal. The myPerformance tool allows you to track goals, development plans, feedback and documents. Navigate to this part of the tool by clicking on the menu next to the home button. In the drop-down, select My Performance. The information you provide in these sections can be viewed by your supervisor.

If you have any questions about the process, please email myperformance@umsl.edu or visit the myPerformance website on the Human Resources page.

There’s Still Time to Sign-up for Focus on the Future!

You can still sign up for Focus on the Future personal and professional development workshops, happening March 27 – 29.  You may sign up for as many courses as you would like, as long as your supervisor has permitted you to do so.  See registration instructions below.

You will earn wellness points for the following courses:
*  I saved too much for retirement! Said nobody, ever.
*  Introduction to Intuitive Eating
*  Suicide Safety on our Campus
*  Change Your Attitude! Change Your Underwear!

The Keynote Speaker event has room for all staff, and everyone is encouraged to attend.  Please sign up (it is the last option listed on the registration page).

Food Truck Tuesday is open to all and you do not need to register, just head out to Parking Lot C between 11:30-1:30pm March 27th.

Registration Instructions for Focus on the Future: Staff Enrichment week

Log into myLearn using your SSO account.

1. Select the icon for “The Library” and the top of the page.

2. Click “UMSL” from the dropdown box. Listed under “University of Missouri Library”.

3. Select the “UMSL Instructor Led Training” on the left side panel. Under “Categories”.

4. Scroll down the page until you find those workshops titles that begin with “Focus on the Future. ” Select the “DETAILS” button for the workshops you find most interesting. There are two pages.

5. To learn more about the course, select the “About” tab. Or by selecting “Details” on the “Sessions” tab.

6. To enroll in the course, select the “Sessions” tab and select “Enroll”. You may withdraw after enrollment as well.

7. After enrolling you will receive an email to your UMSL account.

You may add that appointment to your Outlook calendar so you don’t forget the event. Open the calendar icon next to “Message”.

8. Select “Save & Close”.