MFA alumni Sally Van Doren and Ron Austin will be reading on Nov. 4 for UMSL’s Monday Noon Series.

Whether you’re a fan of poetry or fiction, you’ll get the best of both worlds Monday at the University of Missouri–St. Louis. Poet Sally Van Doren, MFA 2000, and fiction writer Ron Austin, MFA 2011, will read for the upcoming installment of the Monday Noon Series.

The reading is from 12:15-1:15 p.m. in room 402 of the J.C. Penney Conference Center. The event is free and open to the public.

Former mentors John Dalton, director of the MFA in Creative Writing program, and Mary Troy, professor of English at UMSL, will join Van Doren and Austin in reading. For additional coverage on Dalton and Troy click here.

Van Doren is the author of “Possessive.” Her debut collection, “Sex at Noon Taxes,” won the Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets. Both collections are published by Louisiana State University Press.

“She possesses a quirky domestic landscape, poetic matters strewn everywhere among life’s neatness. We’re left fascinated by the inventive varieties of life’s words,” said Al Filreis, Kelly Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, of “Possessive.”

Austin recently had his story “Snakes, Thieves, Liars” published in “drafthorse.” His short story “Do It Yourself” appeared in Black Warrior Review in 2012. He teaches composition at Florissant (Mo.) Valley Community College and is writing a collection of short stories: “Avery Colt Is A Snake, A Thief, A Liar.”

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Marisol Ramirez

Marisol Ramirez

Eye on UMSL: A day in the life
Eye on UMSL: A day in the life

Students from UMSL’s College of Optometry and College of Nursing participated in a simulation designed to expose them to the complexities of poverty.

Eye on UMSL: A day in the life

Students from UMSL’s College of Optometry and College of Nursing participated in a simulation designed to expose them to the complexities of poverty.

Eye on UMSL: A day in the life

Students from UMSL’s College of Optometry and College of Nursing participated in a simulation designed to expose them to the complexities of poverty.