Archive for the ‘Information Systems’ Category

UMSL Tutoring and Lab Services For Business Students  

By: Chris Copithorne

The University of Missouri – St. Louis (UMSL) offers business students different types of resources to ensure student success. One of the best features they offer is tutoring programs and labs for students from all business-related majors. Specifically, these majors include: Accounting, Finance, Supply Chain and Analytics, and Information Systems. There is also a Writing Center and a Math Academic Center available, both located in 222 SSB.


Math and Writing Centers are probably the most well-known by students, but many other fields are just as valuable and should be taken advantage of by business students. For instance, the Finance Lab for Bloomberg Terminal Use is something every student should get themselves familiar with. It is a new feature offered to business students on the first floor of the new business building – Anheuser Bush Hall. Bloomberg Terminal is a software which helps monitor financial data in real-time. This resource offers the opportunity for real-world experience, especially for those who plan to pursue a career in finance.

Tutoring outlets and resources meet the dynamic needs of business students studying in a variety of fields at the undergraduate and graduate level. For instance, an undergraduate business student working on pre-requisite courses in Economics could take advantage of the Economics Resource Center (ERC) located in 452 SSB. Moreover, students can improve their understanding in other technical disciplines like: Mathematics/Writing (222 SSB), Accounting (006 ABH), Management Information Systems (200 ESH), and Supply Chain (002 ABH) in their respective tutoring Centers. All of these tutoring services function on a walk-in basis, but the writing center does require an appointment to receive assistance. This is due to the ambiguous time requirements which is necessary to accurately review, evaluate, and guide a student on a writing assignment. For additional information concerning hours of operation for Tutoring services in Business, please click here.   

Conversely, if you have the ability to help others in these subjects, you can become a tutor. Oftentimes these boast a high degree of flexibility regarding the tutor’s class schedule. These coveted positions are usually given to students who have demonstrated the highest level of proficiency in the courses that they tutor. Prospective business students who need help from a tutor should feel assured in knowing that they are working with the best and brightest in the UMSL Community. Tutors are usually hand-picked by department heads and leaders who look for patient and intelligent students to fill these roles.

Clearly, the tutoring program at UMSL is something that provides huge benefits to all parties involved. It is the hope of the College of Business that students and tutors will cultivate long-lasting relationships through common career interests in the field of business. These relationships often lead to additional networking opportunities through business clubs and organizations within the UMSL community. Tutoring services are meant to serve the needs of business students and augment current efforts in their respective courses. To make the most out of tutoring services, students should come prepared with specific questions on practice problems or assignments. The overall difference tutoring services can make is profound, as students exceed and achieve their academic goals.


 

UX Design – What is it and why is it so important today?

By: Chidu Subbiah

User experience (UX) can be defined as the customer’s perception and how they interact with the website, applications, products, services, and the organization. It is the lens through which your users view the company as a whole. UX refers to a whole continuum that starts with user experience research and ends with user experience design. We apply various techniques as part of UX research to help add context and insight into the design process. UX research primarily helps to understand the needs of the users and identifies the requirements of the product. The research is the core part of the planning process because companies want to design a website or mobile application that is user friendly for the intended audience.

This blog originally appeared on UMSL Digital Mindshare. To read the full article, click here.

Technology conference sheds light on the future of cybersecurity

Student conference organizers (from left) Jestika Gajjar, Kerrine Nelson and Tracee Stewart joined industry leaders from across the country at the event, which focused on combating cyberattacks. (Photo by August Jennewein)

Student conference organizers (from left) Jestika Gajjar, Kerrine Nelson and Tracee Stewart joined industry leaders from across the country at the event, which focused on combating cyberattacks. (Photo by August Jennewein)

Keylogging software, phishing scams and remote access Trojans are just a few of the security threats consumers and corporations face each day.

On Nov. 18, information technology professionals representing companies such as MasterCard, Ameren, Centene, Edward Jones and Express Scripts converged on the University of Missouri–St. Louis campus to discuss the best strategies for information defense at the MasterCard St. Louis Cybersecurity Conference 2016.

Click here to read the full article.

ISCC 2015

iscc keynoteThe Information Systems Career Conference on April 23rd was a SUCCESS! 100+ students and 12 companies participated in the job fair. Also, there were four great panel discussions on cybersecurity, business intelligence, cloud computing and mobile applications, as well as inspiring speeches by Prof. Vicki Sauter and Prof. Brian Lawton.

Do You Know Who Grace Murray Hopper Was?

Professor Vicki Sauter

 

Vicki L. Sauter
Professor of Information Systems

Have you been on campus studying and just need a break, but cannot think of anything to do?  Sure, you could go to the Millennium Center and get some food, or the gym and work out.  Or, you could go to art galleries on campus, such as Gallery Visio or Gallery 210.  But, you have done all those things before and you are looking for something new.  Well, come over to the second floor of Express Scripts Hall and see Grace’s Place.

Who is Grace and what’s at her Place? Grace’s Place is the only technology museum on campus . . . and some say even in St. Louis. Think about it, can you imagine not having your phone or tablet? Do you know why they are designed as they are, and how do they relate to those old things you see on Nickelodeon?

Do you know why we call mistakes in computers “bugs?” Do you know why we “dial” a phone? Do you know what is called the “Victorian Internet?” Do you know that computer chips are “grown,” not “made?” Have you ever seen a “gingerbread house” made out of computer parts? Did you know that Barbie was once cast as a systems engineer? Can you imagine creating art to represent parts of computers? Have you looked at how advertising of computing has changed over time? Or have you ever thought of how computers have been depicted on magazine covers over time? Grace’s Place provides a blend of the history of computing and the uses of computers in business in a unique way.

Grace’s Place started out “small,” with a few display cases and some wire shelves. We now have all of those things and more. We have a fairly complete set of early PC’s (including “clones”) and Apple products (anyone want to donate an Apple I to the collection?). But, we also have old “dumb” terminals and Heathkit analog computers. These things look like they belong in an old movie! We have modems from acoustic couplers to smart device modems, examples of tapes, cards, and a variety of disks, lots of CPUs, tubes, telephones, smart devices, and more. We have old minicomputers, terminals and decwriters, and the power cord, peripheral cords, and other components from an old mainframe, We have advertising from various eras, and posters. It is a museum in spirit, even if it is only a gallery in size.

This gallery is called “Grace’s Place” in honor of Grace Murray Hopper an early pioneer in computing, who is well-recognized for her work with the COBOL programming language. Without COBOL, computers would not have entered the business environment, and it still runs a significant number of major applications worldwide today.. She also is recognized as the originator of the idea of making computer languages accessible to people solving business problems. Grace Murray Hopper believed it was critical to educate young people, especially about computers, and this exhibit would do that.

However, perhaps the best reason to name it after Grace is because she understood the importance of making things simple when explaining complex topics, and found it useful to use tangible items to help with that explanation. We have an exhibit that can explain the “Hopper nanosecond” and why it is important.. We also have a replica of Dr. Hopper’s log book (the original of which is in the Smithsonian) that included a taped down moth that she found in the computer when she claimed the computer had a “bug.” Look also at the Time cover from January 23, 1950 which shows a stylized Mark III computer that happens to have a navy cap and sleeves (that I think gives a nod to Dr. Hopper).

Over the years, though, Grace’s Place has grown in depth too. One patron had a collection of typewriters that she donated as “predecessors to word processors,” and we added a collection of “computing devices,” including slide rules, calculators, abacus and a Marchand comptometer. You can spend a lot of time in Grace’s Place (and you are all invited to do so) because there is so much squeezed into a small space.

Bremen – Summer 2014

Richard Navarro

 

Richard A Navarro
Assistant Teaching Professor of Information Systems

 

Bremen Germany may be best known to some of us as the Brothers Grimm fairytale home of a Donkey, a dog, a cat and a rooster … the Bremen Musicians.
bremenBremen Germany is becoming well known as the home of the Hoschuler Bremen, a science and business oriented university and one of UMSL’s summer study abroad partner universities.

Summer 2014 saw thirteen UMSL students joining 165 other students from 33 countries who have come together with an international faculty as part of the Hochuler Bremen International Summer Institute K program. Our UMSL participants enrolled in courses varying from German culture and language to International Project Management.  The program offers students the opportunity to earn up to six credit hours, to interact with a truly global student body, to travel, and to grow.

Bremen itself is a medium sized city and, although 60 km from the North Sea, a major seaport.  It has a pleasant climate.  It has an active downtown area, modern shopping, covered pedestrian malls, and rathskellers and  restaurants, disco clubs and climbing walls. Class schedules are structured to afford maximum travel opportunities and Bremen  is connected to the rest of Germany and Europe by a fine, convenient, and easy to navigate rail system that well supports ones weekend travel plans, and … it is, in short, a fine place to spend a month..

Interested?   Contact Dr. Rottmann to see if there is Germany in your future.